Kategoriarkiv: Rupture of the posterior cruciate ligament

KONDITION

week15+

GENOPTRÆNING

TRAINING LADDER FOR CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS:
FOR RUPTURE OF THE POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT
(RUPTURA LIGAMENTUM CRUCIATUM POSTERIUS)

WEEK 15 +

The following exercises can only be considered as a supplement to the guidelines furnished by the doctor which performed the operation. Specific precautions are necessary as the operation can be complicated. The training must not bring about swelling or pain in the knee.
KONDITION
Unlimited: Cycling. Swimming. Running.

UDSPÆNDING
(10 min):

Lie on your back. Draw the injured leg up towards your head so that the muscles in the back of the thigh become increasingly stretched. Perform the exercise with outstretched as well as bent knee. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating. The exercise can also be performed standing with the injured leg outstretched on a chair while the upper body is bent slightly forwards.

Stand with support from the back of a chair or the wall. Using your hand, bend the knee and draw the foot up and your knee slightly backwards so that the muscles in the front of the thigh become increasingly stretched. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating. The exercise can also be done lying down. If you lie on your stomach you can draw the foot up by using a towel.

Lie on your side on a table. Bend one leg up under your body and let the other hang over the edge of the table so that the muscles in the outer side of the thigh become increasingly stretched. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating. The exercise can also be done standing by placing the outstretched injured leg behind the good leg at the same time as bending over the injured leg.

Stand with one leg outstretched and the other slightly bent. Thrust your weight to the side over the bent leg so that the inner side of the opposite thigh becomes increasingly stretched. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating.

Lie on your back with one leg outstretched and the other bent with the foot on the other side of the outstretched leg. Draw the knee up towards the opposite shoulder so that the buttocks become increasingly stretched. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating.

KOORDINATION
(10 min):

Seesaw. Balance on two legs, possibly using a hand as support against the wall, balancing subsequently on one leg without support. Look straight ahead and keep knees bent.

Stand on the healthy leg with elastic fixed around the hip. The elastic should be fixed to the wall or a wall bar. Take-off on the healthy leg and land on the leg to be trained and keep your balance. Remember that the elastic should be positioned so that it gives resistance at the moment of take-off. Change legs.

Stand on the injured leg with your upper body bent forwards at 90 degrees. Lift the good leg in a straight line behind you. When you feel comfortable with the exercise, it can be made more difficult by closing your eyes.

STYRKE
(40 min):

Up and down from the stool with load. Tie elastic around the hip and go up on the stool in a slow movement. The elastic should be fastened to the wall.

Stand with elastic around the hip. Step forward over one knee and hold the front foot firmly against the floor. Bend the rear leg and go forward onto your toes. Remember to change leg.

Lie on your back with a ball or firm round cushion under both feet. Roll the ball backwards and forwards in a steady pace while lifting your backside.

Lie on your back with a ball or firm round cushion under the injured leg. Lift your backside up from the floor and stretch the healthy leg. Hold the position for a few seconds.

Stand with your back against a wall with a ball or firm round cushion between the wall and your back. Slowly go down to bend your knee 90 degrees before slowly rising up again.

Stand on the healthy leg with the elastic around the inside of the injured leg. Move the injured leg from side to side in a slow smooth movement. Moving the position of the elastic lower down the leg can increase the load.

Stand on the healthy leg with the elastic around the outside of the injured leg. Move the injured leg from side to side in a slow smooth movement. Moving the position of the elastic lower down the leg can increase the load.

Stretching is carried out in the following way: stretch the muscle group for 3-5 seconds. Relax for 3-5 seconds. The muscle group should subsequently be stretched for 20 seconds. The muscle is allowed to be tender, but must not hurt. Relax for 20 seconds, after which the procedure can be repeated.

The time consumed for stretching, coordination and strength training can be altered depending on the training opportunities available and individual requirements.

KONDITION

week13-15

GENOPTRÆNING

TRAINING LADDER FOR CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS:
FOR RUPTURE OF THE POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT
(RUPTURA LIGAMENTUM CRUCIATUM POSTERIUS)

WEEK 13-15

 

The following exercises can only be considered as a supplement to the guidelines furnished by the doctor which performed the operation. Specific precautions are necessary as the operation can be complicated. The training must not bring about swelling or pain in the knee.
KONDITION
Unlimited: Cycling. Swimming. Light running.

UDSPÆNDING
(10 min):

Lie on your back. Draw the injured leg up towards your head so that the muscles in the back of the thigh become increasingly stretched. Perform the exercise with outstretched as well as bent knee. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating. The exercise can also be performed standing with the injured leg outstretched on a chair while the upper body is bent slightly forwards.

Stand with support from the back of a chair or the wall. Using your hand, bend the knee and draw the foot up and your knee slightly backwards so that the muscles in the front of the thigh become increasingly stretched. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating. The exercise can also be done lying down. If you lie on your stomach you can draw the foot up by using a towel.

Lie on your side on a table. Bend one leg up under your body and let the other hang over the edge of the table so that the muscles in the outer side of the thigh become increasingly stretched. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating. The exercise can also be done standing by placing the outstretched injured leg behind the good leg at the same time as bending over the injured leg.

Stand with one leg outstretched and the other slightly bent. Thrust your weight to the side over the bent leg so that the inner side of the opposite thigh becomes increasingly stretched. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating.

Lie on your back with one leg outstretched and the other bent with the foot on the other side of the outstretched leg. Draw the knee up towards the opposite shoulder so that the buttocks become increasingly stretched. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating.

KOORDINATION
(10 min):

Seesaw. Balance on two legs, possibly using a hand as support against the wall, balancing subsequently on one leg without support. Look straight ahead and keep knees bent.

Stand on the healthy leg with elastic fixed around the hip. The elastic should be fixed to the wall or a wall bar. Take-off on the healthy leg and land on the leg to be trained and keep your balance. Remember that the elastic should be positioned so that it gives resistance at the moment of take-off. Change legs.

Stand on the injured leg with your upper body bent forwards at 90 degrees. Lift the good leg in a straight line behind you. When you feel comfortable with the exercise, it can be made more difficult by closing your eyes.

STYRKE
(40 min):

Stand with your back to the wall with your weight on both feet. Slowly go down and bend the knee to 90 degrees, and slowly rise again.

Stand with elastic around the hip. Step forward over one knee and hold the front foot firmly against the floor. Bend the rear leg and go forward onto your toes. Remember to change leg.

Lie on your back with a ball or firm round cushion under both feet. Roll the ball backwards and forwards in a steady pace while lifting your backside.

Lie on your back with a ball or firm round cushion under the injured leg. Lift your backside up from the floor and stretch the healthy leg. Hold the position for a few seconds.

Stand on the healthy leg with the elastic around the inside of the injured leg. Move the injured leg from side to side in a slow smooth movement. Moving the position of the elastic lower down the leg can increase the load.

Stand on the healthy leg with the elastic around the outside of the injured leg. Move the injured leg from side to side in a slow smooth movement. Moving the position of the elastic lower down the leg can increase the load.

Stretching is carried out in the following way: stretch the muscle group for 3-5 seconds. Relax for 3-5 seconds. The muscle group should subsequently be stretched for 20 seconds. The muscle is allowed to be tender, but must not hurt. Relax for 20 seconds, after which the procedure can be repeated.

The time consumed for stretching, coordination and strength training can be altered depending on the training opportunities available and individual requirements.

KONDITION

week10-12

GENOPTRÆNING

TRAINING LADDER FOR CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS:
FOR RUPTURE OF THE POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT
(RUPTURA LIGAMENTUM CRUCIATUM POSTERIUS)

WEEK 10-12

The following exercises can only be considered as a supplement to the guidelines furnished by the doctor which performed the operation. Specific precautions are necessary as the operation can be complicated. The training must not bring about swelling or pain in the knee.
KONDITION
Unlimited: Cycling with raised saddle. Swimming. Light jogging.

UDSPÆNDING
(10 min):

Lie on your back. Draw the injured leg up towards your head so that the muscles in the back of the thigh become increasingly stretched. Perform the exercise with outstretched as well as bent knee. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating. The exercise can also be performed standing with the injured leg outstretched on a chair while the upper body is bent slightly forwards.

Stand with support from the back of a chair or the wall. Using your hand, bend the knee and draw the foot up and your knee slightly backwards so that the muscles in the front of the thigh become increasingly stretched. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating. The exercise can also be done lying down. If you lie on your stomach you can draw the foot up by using a towel.

Lie on your side on a table. Bend one leg up under your body and let the other hang over the edge of the table so that the muscles in the outer side of the thigh become increasingly stretched. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating. The exercise can also be done standing by placing the outstretched injured leg behind the good leg at the same time as bending over the injured leg.

Stand with one leg outstretched and the other slightly bent. Thrust your weight to the side over the bent leg so that the inner side of the opposite thigh becomes increasingly stretched. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating.

Lie on your back with one leg outstretched and the other bent with the foot on the other side of the outstretched leg. Draw the knee up towards the opposite shoulder so that the buttocks become increasingly stretched. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating.

KOORDINATION
(10 min):

Stand on the healthy leg with elastic fixed around the hip. The elastic should be fixed to the wall or a wall bar. Take-off on the healthy leg and land on the leg to be trained and keep your balance. Remember that the elastic should be positioned so that it gives resistance at the moment of take-off. Change legs.

Seesaw. Balance on two legs, possibly using a hand as support against the wall, balancing subsequently on one leg without support. Look straight ahead and keep knees bent.

Stand on the injured leg with your upper body bent forwards at 90 degrees. Lift the good leg in a straight line behind you. When you feel comfortable with the exercise, it can be made more difficult by closing your eyes.

STYRKE
(40 min):

Up and down from the stool with load. Tie elastic around the hip and go up on the stool in a slow movement. The elastic should be fastened to the wall.

Go forward on the injured leg until the knee is bent to max. 90 degrees. Stand up on the same leg and return to the starting position.

Lie on your back with a ball or firm round cushion under both feet. Roll the ball backwards and forwards in a steady pace while lifting your backside.

Lie on your back with a ball or firm round cushion under the injured leg. Lift your backside up from the floor and stretch the healthy leg. Hold the position for a few seconds.

Lie on the floor with slightly bent knees. Put the elastic under the foot and hold firmly with your hands. Stretch the knee so that the elastic is drawn tight and slowly bend the knee again.

Stand on the good leg with the elastic around the inner side of the injured leg above the knee. Move the injured leg from side to side in a slow movement.

Stand on the good leg with the elastic around the outer side of the injured leg above the knee. Move the injured leg from side to side in a slow movement.

Stretching is carried out in the following way: stretch the muscle group for 3-5 seconds. Relax for 3-5 seconds. The muscle group should subsequently be stretched for 20 seconds. The muscle is allowed to be tender, but must not hurt. Relax for 20 seconds, after which the procedure can be repeated.

The time consumed for stretching, coordination and strength training can be altered depending on the training opportunities available and individual requirements.

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KONDITION

week7-9

GENOPTRÆNING

TRAINING LADDER FOR CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS:
FOR RUPTURE OF THE POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT
(RUPTURA LIGAMENTUM CRUCIATUM POSTERIUS)

WEEK 7-9

The following exercises can only be considered as a supplement to the guidelines furnished by the doctor which performed the operation. Specific precautions are necessary as the operation can be complicated. The training must not bring about swelling or pain in the knee.
KONDITION
Unlimited: Cycling with raised saddle. Swimming. Running in deep water.

UDSPÆNDING
(10 min):

Lie on your back. Draw the injured leg up towards your head so that the muscles in the back of the thigh become increasingly stretched. Perform the exercise with outstretched as well as bent knee. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating. The exercise can also be performed standing with the injured leg outstretched on a chair while the upper body is bent slightly forwards.

Stand with support from the back of a chair or the wall. Using your hand, bend the knee and draw the foot up and your knee slightly backwards so that the muscles in the front of the thigh become increasingly stretched. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating. The exercise can also be done lying down. If you lie on your stomach you can draw the foot up by using a towel.

Lie on your side on a table. Bend one leg up under your body and let the other hang over the edge of the table so that the muscles in the outer side of the thigh become increasingly stretched. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating. The exercise can also be done standing by placing the outstretched injured leg behind the good leg at the same time as bending over the injured leg.

Stand with one leg outstretched and the other slightly bent. Thrust your weight to the side over the bent leg so that the inner side of the opposite thigh becomes increasingly stretched. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating.


KOORDINATION
(5 min):

Seesaw. Balance on two legs, possibly using a hand as support against the wall, balancing subsequently on one leg without support. Look straight ahead and keep knees bent.

Stand on the injured leg with your upper body bent forwards at 90 degrees. Lift the good leg in a straight line behind you. When you feel comfortable with the exercise, it can be made more difficult by closing your eyes.

STYRKE
(25 min):

Lie on the floor with slightly bent knees. Put the elastic under the foot and hold firmly with your hands. Stretch the knee so that the elastic is drawn tight and slowly bend the knee again.

Go up and down from the stool. Go up with alternating right and left legs.

Lie on your back with a ball or firm round cushion under both feet. Raise your backside up from the floor and hold your feet on the ball. Hold the position for a few seconds.

Lie on your back with a ball or firm round cushion under both feet. Roll the ball backwards and forwards in a steady pace while lifting your backside.

Lie on your back with a ball or firm round cushion under the injured leg. Lift your backside up from the floor and stretch the healthy leg. Hold the position for a few seconds.

Stand on the good leg with the elastic around the inner side of the injured leg above the knee. Move the injured leg from side to side in a slow movement.

Stand on the good leg with the elastic around the outer side of the injured leg above the knee. Move the injured leg from side to side in a slow movement.

Stretching is carried out in the following way: stretch the muscle group for 3-5 seconds. Relax for 3-5 seconds. The muscle group should subsequently be stretched for 20 seconds. The muscle is allowed to be tender, but must not hurt. Relax for 20 seconds, after which the procedure can be repeated.

The time consumed for stretching, coordination and strength training can be altered depending on the training opportunities available and individual requirements.

KONDITION

week4-6

GENOPTRÆNING

TRAINING LADDER FOR CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS:
FOR RUPTURE OF THE POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT
(RUPTURA LIGAMENTUM CRUCIATUM POSTERIUS)

WEEK 4-6

The following exercises can only be considered as a supplement to the guidelines furnished by the doctor which performed the operation. Specific precautions are necessary as the operation can be complicated. The training must not bring about swelling or pain in the knee.
KONDITION
Unlimited: Swimming. Running in deep water.

UDSPÆNDING
(5 min):

Stand with the injured leg stretched backwards with the toes facing front. Slowly bend the knee so that the calf muscles become increasingly stretched. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating.

Stand with the injured leg outstretched with the ankle joint bent up against the wall. Press your abdomen against the wall so that the calf muscles become increasingly stretched. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating.

Lie on your back. Draw the injured leg up towards your head so that the muscles in the back of the thigh become increasingly stretched. Perform the exercise with outstretched as well as bent knee. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating. The exercise can also be performed standing with the injured leg outstretched on a chair while the upper body is bent slightly forwards.

Lie on your side on a table. Bend one leg up under your body and let the other hang over the edge of the table so that the muscles in the outer side of the thigh become increasingly stretched. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating. The exercise can also be done standing by placing the outstretched injured leg behind the good leg at the same time as bending over the injured leg.

Stand with one leg outstretched and the other slightly bent. Thrust your weight to the side over the bent leg so that the inner side of the opposite thigh becomes increasingly stretched. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating.

KOORDINATION
(5 min):

Stand on one leg. Play the ball up against the wall.

Stand on your toes with bent knees. Place your weight forward on the toes and keep your balance.

STYRKE
(20 min):

Lie on the floor with slightly bent knees. Put the elastic under the foot and hold firmly with your hands. Stretch the knee so that the elastic is drawn tight and slowly bend the knee again.

Stand on the injured leg on a stool. Go up and down to bend the knee, with the healthy leg hanging over the edge of the stool.

Lie on your back with a ball or firm round cushion under both feet. Raise your backside up from the floor and hold your feet on the ball. Hold the position for a few seconds.

Lie on your back with a ball or firm round cushion under both feet. Roll the ball backwards and forwards in a steady pace while lifting your backside.

Lie on your back with a ball or firm round cushion under the injured leg. Lift your backside up from the floor and stretch the healthy leg. Hold the position for a few seconds.

Stand on the good leg with the elastic around the inner side of the injured leg above the knee. Move the injured leg from side to side in a slow movement.

Stand on the good leg with the elastic around the outer side of the injured leg above the knee. Move the injured leg from side to side in a slow movement.

Stretching is carried out in the following way: stretch the muscle group for 3-5 seconds. Relax for 3-5 seconds. The muscle group should subsequently be stretched for 20 seconds. The muscle is allowed to be tender, but must not hurt. Relax for 20 seconds, after which the procedure can be repeated.

The time consumed for stretching, coordination and strength training can be altered depending on the training opportunities available and individual requirements.

KONDITION

week2-3

GENOPTRÆNING

TRAINING LADDER FOR CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS:
FOR RUPTURE OF THE POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT
(RUPTURA LIGAMENTUM CRUCIATUM POSTERIUS)

WEEK 2-3

The following exercises can only be considered as a supplement to the guidelines furnished by the doctor which performed the operation. Specific precautions are necessary as the operation can be complicated. The training must not bring about swelling or pain in the knee.
KONDITION
Unlimited: Swimming (crawl).

UDSPÆNDING
(5 min):

Stand with the injured leg stretched backwards with the toes facing front. Slowly bend the knee so that the calf muscles become increasingly stretched. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating.

Stand with the injured leg outstretched with the ankle joint bent up against the wall. Press your abdomen against the wall so that the calf muscles become increasingly stretched. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating.

Lie on your back. Draw the injured leg up towards your head so that the muscles in the back of the thigh become increasingly stretched. Perform the exercise with outstretched as well as bent knee. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating. The exercise can also be performed standing with the injured leg outstretched on a chair while the upper body is bent slightly forwards.

Stand with one leg outstretched and the other slightly bent. Thrust your weight to the side over the bent leg so that the inner side of the opposite thigh becomes increasingly stretched. Hold the position for 20 seconds and relax for 20 seconds before repeating.


KOORDINATION
(5 min):

Stand on one leg on the floor or a mattress. Look straight ahead and keep the knee slightly bent.

Stand on your toes with bent knees. Place your weight forward on the toes and keep your balance.


STYRKE
(15 min):

Sit on a chair with the injured leg on a stool or similar. Lift the leg above the stool with the foot flexed at a maximum, and hold the position for 10 seconds, followed by 10 seconds rest. The exercise should be repeated for approx. 3 minutes.

Lie on your stomach on the floor with your arms above your head and with outstretched legs. Lift right arm and left leg together, changing to lift left arm and right leg together.

Lie on the floor with the injured leg. Press the leg against the floor and tip the foot up. Hold the position for approx. 10 seconds. You have to feel a stretching of the anterior thigh. Rest for approx. 10 seconds. Repeat the exercise for approx. 3 minutes.

Lie on your back with a ball or firm round cushion under both feet. Raise your backside up from the floor and hold your feet on the ball. Hold the position for a few seconds.

Lie on your back with the heel of the injured leg resting on the bench or a smooth floor. Bend and stretch the injured leg while keeping contact with the surface at all times.

Lie on your back with legs bent and a ball between your knees. Squeeze your knees together for 25 seconds, and rest for 10 seconds before repeating.

Stretching is carried out in the following way: stretch the muscle group for 3-5 seconds. Relax for 3-5 seconds. The muscle group should subsequently be stretched for 20 seconds. The muscle is allowed to be tender, but must not hurt. Relax for 20 seconds, after which the procedure can be repeated.

The time consumed for stretching, coordination and strength training can be altered depending on the training opportunities available and individual requirements.

KOORDINATION

week1

GENOPTRÆNING

TRAINING LADDER FOR CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS:
FOR RUPTURE OF THE POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT
(RUPTURA LIGAMENTUM CRUCIATUM POSTERIUS)

WEEK 1

The following exercises can only be considered as a supplement to the guidelines furnished by the doctor which performed the operation. Specific precautions are necessary as the operation can be complicated. The training must not bring about swelling or pain in the knee.
KOORDINATION
(5 min):

Stand on one leg on the floor or a mattress. Look straight ahead and keep the knee slightly bent.

STYRKE
(15 min):

Sit on a chair with the injured leg on a stool or similar. Lift the leg above the stool with the foot flexed at a maximum, and hold the position for 10 seconds, followed by 10 seconds rest. The exercise should be repeated for approx. 3 minutes.

Lie on the floor with the injured leg. Press the leg against the floor and tip the foot up. Hold the position for approx. 10 seconds. You have to feel a stretching of the anterior thigh. Rest for approx. 10 seconds. Repeat the exercise for approx. 3 minutes.

Lie on your stomach on the floor with your arms above your head and with outstretched legs. Lift right arm and left leg together, changing to lift left arm and right leg together.

Stretching is carried out in the following way: stretch the muscle group for 3-5 seconds. Relax for 3-5 seconds. The muscle group should subsequently be stretched for 20 seconds. The muscle is allowed to be tender, but must not hurt. Relax for 20 seconds, after which the procedure can be repeated.

The time consumed for stretching, coordination and strength training can be altered depending on the training opportunities available and individual requirements.

treatment-article1

SportNetDoc

Posterior cruciate ligament injuries of the knee joint.

Janousek AT, Jones DG, Clatworthy M, Higgins LD, Fu FH. Sports Med 1999 Dec;28(6):429-41.

Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries have a reported incidence of between 3 and 37%, depending on the clinical setting. The most common mechanism of injury in motor vehicle accidents is a dashboard injury or direct force to the proximal anterior tibia. Sports related injuries result from hyperflexion of the knee with the foot typically plantarflexed. The latter mechanism is the most common cause of isolated PCL injuries, while in the trauma population as many as 95% of patients with knee injuries have combined ligamentous damage. Improved knowledge at an anatomical, biomechanical and clinical level has provided the orthopaedist with a more defined treatment algorithm. Isolated, partial PCL injuries (grades I and II) can best be treated nonoperatively while complete injuries (grade III) may require operative treatment based on clinical symptoms. All combined ligamentous injuries usually respond best with surgical management.

examination-article1

SportNetDoc

Normal and acutely torn posterior cruciate ligament of the knee at US evaluation: preliminary experience.

Cho KH, Lee DC, Chhem RK, Kim SD, Bouffard JA, Cardinal E, Park BH. Radiology 2001 May;219(2):375-80.

PURPOSE: To determine the ultrasonographic (US) findings of normal and acutely torn posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) of the knee and evaluate the usefulness of US in the injured PCL. 

MATERIALS AND METHODS: US images were obtained in 30 knees in 15 asymptomatic volunteers as a control group and in 35 patients clinically suspected of having an acute PCL injury. Only the distal half of the PCL was evaluated. Of the 35 patients, 28 had their PCL status confirmed: 13 had a normal PCL at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plus clinical examination, and 15 had a torn PCL at either MR imaging and surgery or MR imaging and clinical follow-up. 

RESULTS: Normal PCLs were homogeneously hypoechoic, with a well-defined posterior border. Torn PCLs were heterogeneously hypoechoic (12 [80%] of 15 patients), with an indistinct posterior margin (11 [73%] of 15 patients). Torn PCLs were significantly thicker (range, 12.0-20.0 mm; mean, 15.6 mm +/- 2.5 [SD]; P <.01), as compared with normal PCLs in 13 patients (range, 3.8-5.8 mm; mean, 4.6 mm +/- 1.0; P <.01) and in the volunteers (range, 3.7-6.2 mm; mean, 4.5 mm +/- 1.2; P <.01). 

CONCLUSION: An acutely torn PCL thickens (>10 mm), loses its sharply defined posterior border, and has a heterogeneously hypoechoic appearance. US may be useful as a screening examination for patients suspected of having PCL injury and for deciding whether to perform more expensive MR imaging or surgical intervention.